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Think, Don’t Simply “Draw”

UX and Design Thinking sketching is about exploring options and solving problems. Too many times, designers feel they need to be “illustrators”. This is not the case. Designers and conceptual thinkers need to be scribes and document what is inside their noggin. Critical thinking and problem-solving are the hallmarks of great design exploration. Many indie game designers have to address a myriad of challenges. From basic UI and visual design to game mechanics, player interactions and practical issues such as coordinate systems, etc. This post address leans toward design specifically, but it is appropriate for all types of conceptual and exploratory visualization. This website may focus on specific genres but the principles are applicable across the board. A good sketchbook will include sketches (the drawing portion), notes, annotations, and any information related to solving problems.

UX Sketchbook, by David Meyers

Example (Above): Basic UI and initial game flow.

UX Sketchbook, by David Meyers
UX Sketchbook, by David Meyers

Example (Above [2 images]): Sketching problem-solving process. Address screen sectors and a coordinate system.

As you can see by the three sample above, your design sketchbook should be a sandbox for problem-solving. Customer experiences, mobile apps and games can present sophisticated challenges. The visualizations above can be of great assistance when sharing your concepts to team members or clients. Imagine attempting to verbally explain the above processes without a visual representation. It is so abstract it would be nearly impossible to communicate to a layman or client.