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ITGM405 Studio I

ITGM405

Students apply their skills to creating a workable interactive project or video game in a simulated professional environment. Topics include content creation within a limited resource environment. The course emphasizes production-oriented goals in order to provide students with a professional skill set and a body of fine art. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 326 or ITGM 356 or ITGM 366, ITGM 336 (Game development) or ITGM 337 or ITGM 347, ITGM 357, ITGM 377 (Interactive design and physical computing).

Professor David Edwin Meyers

Contact: 270-577-2715 (text)

dmeyers@scad.edu

Class 01: Mon, September 09, 2019: Presentation of skills // Compedium of student work so far, specialty, strengths, team experience. This will be used to organize teams for group projects

Class 02: Wed, September 11, 2019:

Lecture:

  • Introduction to Class Introduction to Materials and Review
  • DUE: Exposition of Work, Career Objectives
  • Assignment 1: Defining objectives. due class 2

Class 03: Mon, September 16, 2019:

  • DUE: Part 1: Defining objectives
  • Assignment: Projects pitches; What you will work on Studio I. Due class 3

Class 04: Wed, September 18, 2019

  • Lecture: Pitching, planning and pre-production
  • in-class: student will prepare their presentation for class 5.
  • Professor review of work in progress

Class 05: Mon, September 23, 2019: 

  • DUE: Part 2: Research, Concept and Pre-production
  • Research
  • Reference/moodboarding
  • Competitive analysis
  • Technology/tools
  • Concept (w Initial Sketches or Notes)
  • Art style moodboard
  • Project concept renders/art
  • Task Tracker estimation (You MUST implement some form of task/time tracking, kanban, gantt chart, trello, etc.)
  • Rough timeline estimate
  • Rough task breakdown
  • Contract signed
  • Professor and peer critique

Class 06: Wed, September 25, 2019: 

  • Lecture: Day-to-day management and documentation maintenance.
  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker (prof will review)
  • Review: upcoming Milestones 1 to 4 and submission process

Class 07: Mon, September 30, 2019:

  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 08: Wed, October 02, 2019:

  • Lecture: Portfolio project prep.
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 09: Mon, October 07, 2019:

  • DUE: Part 3: Milestone 1 – Greybox/wireframes/early render
  • Depending on the nature of the project, this Milestone represent the first pass at the work and should be representative of the build intention.
  • Accurate Task tracking will be part of the grade.
  • Professor and peer critique

Class 10: Wed, October 09, 2019:

  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 11: Mon, October 14, 2019:

  • DUE: Part 4: Milestone 2 – Medium to High-fidelity/rendered mockups/detailed wireframes
  • Depending on the nature of the project, this Milestone represent a second pass at the work and should start representing some elements at final quality.
  • Accurate Task tracking will be part of the grade.
  • Professor and peer critique

Class 12: Wed, October 16, 2019:

  • Lecture: Professional Portfolio and Websites
  • in-class: discussion/research on various Game/Interactive Industry sites
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 13: Mon, October 21, 2019:

  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 14: Wed, October 23, 2019: 

  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 15: Mon, October 28, 2019: 

  • DUE: Part 5: Milestone 3 – Prototype/Advanced render
  • Depending on the nature of the project, this Milestone represent a third pass at the work and most elements should be present and working at almost final quality.
  • Accurate Task tracking will be part of the grade.
  • Professor and peer critique

Class 16: Wed, October 30, 2019:

  • DUE: Part 5 (CONT): Milestone 3 – Prototype/Advanced render
  • Lecture: How to pitch a project to stakeholders/investors?
  • Discussion: review upcoming Indie projects/concepts/pitches

Class 17: Mon, November 04, 2019

  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker
  • Studio: Student develop their work in-class, with feedback from peers and professor.

Class 18: Wed, November 06, 2019:

  • Lecture: User-testing and post-mortem assessment.
  • Discussion: in-class review of user-testing and industry post mortem examples and discussion.
  • in-class: Review of Work in Progress and Task tracker

Class 19: Mon, November 11, 2019:

DUE: Part 6: FINAL PRESENTATION:

  • Milestone 4 – Final presentation
  • This is the final Milestone: the project is complete and polished.
  • A Post Mortem clearly establishes the learning opportunities

Class 20: Wed, November 13, 2019:

DUE: Part 6: FINAL PRESENTATION (CONT):

  • Milestone 4 – Final presentation
  • This is the final Milestone: the project is complete and polished.
  • A Post Mortem clearly establishes the learning opportunities

Class 01: Mon, September 09, 2019:

Presentation of skills // Compedium of student work so far, specialty, strengths, team experience. This will be used to organize teams for group projects

Class 03: Mon, September 16, 2019:

DUE: Part 1: Pitches and Defining objectives

Class 05: Mon, September 23, 2019:

DUE: Part 2: Detailed Calendar, Initial Task Backlog, Research, Concept and Pre-production

Class 09: Mon, October 07, 2019:

DUE: Part 3: Graybox/wireframes/early render

Class 11: Mon, October 14, 2019:

DUE: Part 4: Medium to High-fidelity/rendered mockups/detailed wireframes

Class 15: Mon, October 28, 2019:

DUE: Part 5: Prototype/Advanced render

Class 16: Wed, October 30, 2019:

DUE: Part 5 (CONT): Prototype/Advanced render

Class 19: Mon, November 11, 2019:

DUE: Part 6: FINAL PRESENTATION

Class 20: Wed, November 13, 2019:

DUE: Part 6: FINAL PRESENTATION (CONT)

Final Studio I Project:

Part 1: Project Proposals and Initial Research

Objective

Create an original and creative Studio I final project proposal. The concept must contain an overview of the overall structure, a basic plan for completion, and how it relates to your chosen field of study. Your concept should also detail why this idea demonstrates a mastery over the subject matter and why it is a fitting and comprehensive synthesis of your studies.

Be as detailed as possible, and include any images or other media that supports your proposal. Many concept documents are in the range of two to five pages. Select your idea carefully, as this will occupy the entire time during the remainder of the quarter. You should consider the originality of the idea, the breadth and depth of the undertaking, and whether it genuinely reflects a core aspect of your studies and interest. You should also select something that you will not mind working on for many, many hours, because you will do just that.

Process Outline

Conceive of an original and creative final project proposal that demonstrates a mastery over your chosen subject matter and can benefit you in your portfolio. It must be one cohesive idea and not a collection of smaller unrelated projects. Your Studio I project proposal should describe in detail not only how it fits with your prior coursework, but also how it extends and provides a means for continuing skill development.

Take a look through your own coursework for areas that interested you, show a need for improvement, or provide a springboard for further, more detailed development. Your project idea should be of sufficient size in scope to be completed during this course, but also be substantial enough to demonstrate a mastery of skills in your area of interest.

Discuss your idea with your professor or advisor if you are unsure about a proper scope. Bear in mind that you will have the opportunity to continuously revise and iterate upon your original idea, and nothing you write here should be considered in its final form. However, having a solid and well-thought-out idea at this stage will only serve to make your future tasks and the final Studio I project a stronger piece of work.

Process Questions

Listed below is a series of questions designed to aid you in addressing the topics in the process outlineand initial research section. While not all of these questions may be relevant to your particular proposal, they indicate the general nature, direction, and level of detail you should be trying to achieve. Do not feel as if you must address every one of these questions or change your project if a question does not apply. They are merely ideas to get you started thinking along the right track. Do not simply write one- sentence answers to these questions and use this as your proposal document. Your document should be written in a standard form and not be a list of uncollected bullet-point statements.

  • What similar or related projects have you completed in previous classes? How do these prepare you for your final project proposal?
  • Have you reviewed competitors or relevant ideas that currently exist in the industry?
  • How does this proposal idea relate or tie together your chosen areas of Study?
  • Does the proposal adequately show the  scope of your skills and area of interest?
  • Is your project proposal of sufficient size to warrant 6-7 units of work?
  • What can you change to make it fit?
  • Does the proposed project demonstrate a mastery of a skills in a particular area?
  • Does the proposed project detail something new or unique for the industry as a whole?
  • How does your proposal fit into your greater career goals?
  • Will you need support from outside resources?
  • Is there something from outside your coursework, such as a different skill set, that you can use to tie in and enrich your idea?
Grading

This is the first stage of the proposal. It should be cleanly designed with a cover sheet and index (as the templated sample illustrates, in drop box, although in a PowerPoint form). It can be vertical or horizontal, but if you use PPT as suggested, it would be best to stick to a horizontal format. Each part or phase of your project will be added to the master document (singular document, and it will build with each upcoming phase),

  • The proposal must include enough information about the proposed idea to get a good sense of scope and direction.
  • The proposal must be of fitting size and scope to serve as your Studio I final project and must show a mature skill set and synthesis of your chosen branch of studies.
  • The proposal must be brief and succinct. Do not ramble on.
  • The proposal must be clear and not muddled. There should not be any ambiguity in your answers and descriptions. Be decisive.
  • The proposed idea must be original to you. It is perfectly acceptable to have inspirational sources, but your product should not mimic or resemble these.
Project A, Part 1 - Power Point Presentation


Part 2: Research, Concept and Pre-production, Outline and Schedule

Objective

Create a task list, basic schedule and outline for your project. This will serve as your main driving force and guide through the remainder of the course and must be complete. You must “visualize” your schedule through the use of a spreadsheet or gantt chart (free online resources are available).

Submit your outline as a continuation (inclusion) of your Power Point Presentation.

  • Research
  • Reference/moodboarding
  • Competitive analysis
  • Technology/tools
  • Concept (w Initial Sketches or Notes)
  • Art style moodboard
  • Project concept renders/art
  • Task Tracker estimation (You MUST implement some form of task/time tracking, kanban, gantt chart, trello, etc.)
  • Rough timeline estimate
  • Rough task breakdown
  • Contract signed
Process Outline

Start breaking down your project idea into concrete pieces. Turn your idea into a list of actual tasks you will need to perform in order to complete it. To begin, find the different, overarching areas of your project and write those down. Then work from each of those to make it more granular. Don’t break down each task as far as it can go, as this will usually lead to too much confusion, but rather stop when you get the task to a level that feels like something you could accomplish in a day or two. Also include any tasks that are more intangible, such as setting aside time to research or learn a new skill.

Now take all these granular-level tasks and compile them in a separate document. Spreadsheets can be useful for this. This compiled list is your task list, and you’ll need to create a schedule from it. Start by making quick guesses, or estimates, for how long each task will take and record these.

Look at the time you have left, and begin to lay out your tasks so that you finish the project on time. You may find you need to overlap some things or revise a few time estimates. You may also find that perhaps your project idea looks like it’s too small or large in scale, now, that you’re trying to lay it all out. Revise and iterate upon your project idea until you’re happy with how it fits. Remember that this isn’t just fitting pieces into a puzzle, and that you will need to work close to the schedule you create in order to complete your project.

Process Questions

Listed below is a series of questions designed to aid you in addressing the topics in the Process Outline section. While not all of these questions may be relevant to your particular project, they indicate the general nature, direction, and level of detail you should be trying to achieve. Do not feel as if you must address every one of these questions if they do not pertain. They are merely ideas to get you started thinking along the right track. Do not simply write one-sentence answers to these questions and use this as your document.

  • How have you tackled smaller, similar projects in the past?
  • How do you like to work? Do you like to break down a project and work on tiny pieces in a linear fashion or jump around between different bits?
  • Do you have any planned vacation, work-related, or known issues you’ll need to work around? Do you know now that you won’t get a lot done in a certain week?
  • Have you found yourself rushing in the past to complete things at the last minute? Do you always build contingency time into your planning?
  • Does your project have any clear delineations or pieces that make them easy to work on separately? Does it have pieces that depend on others being finished first?
  • Are you using collaborators and can you manage their production?
Grading

The outline should take into account all parts of your project.

  • The schedule must span the entire length of the (remainder of the) course and not have needless fluff.
  • The schedule should, however, not be so tight that it does not leave room for error. Try to build in contingency time where you can.
  • No one task of the schedule should span for longer than five days (one week). If you find tasks that do, break them up into smaller tasks.
  • The outline should be presented clearly and cleanly and should be easy for anyone to follow.
  • The schedule should be presented in a clear format that makes it easy to see which tasks need to be started and completed by what date.
Project A, Part 2 - Power Point Presentation due on Thursday, Oct 11, 2018.


Part 3: Sketches and Ideation/Greybox/Wireframes/Early render

Objective

Submit a part of your project that demonstrates visual research, sketches, and ideas in development. Your submission needs to show in some way that you have solidified an idea and are confident about the project as well as finishing it in a timely manner. The ideation presentation needs to clearly show your direction and thinking. This is the perfect time to get peer feedback before committing to an absolute direction. This doesn’t have to be a lengthy presentation (you may find as few as five slides are enough), but it does need to be complete.

Process Outline

Begin by looking at what kind of project you are making, revisit and research what your competitors are doing, how are they alike and different. What are you bringing to the table that is fresh, different or uniquely yours? You may create inspiration or mood boards to illustrate your influence and visual aesthetic. Sketching in a digital format and/or tradition is fully acceptable. For this assignment, you’ll need to create a visual slide presentation within your PowerPont document. Keep in mind, each part of the process will be bound together as a final process document. If you use PowerPoint as suggested, the process book will be output as a PDF and placed in the Drop Box.

Process Questions

Listed below is a series of queries designed to aid you in addressing the topics in the Ideation and development section. While not all of these questions may be relevant to your particular project, they indicate the general nature, direction, and level of detail you should be trying to achieve. Do not feel as if you must address every one of these questions if they do not pertain. They are merely ideas to get you started thinking along the right track.

  • Am I illustrating the scope of my project through diagrams, sketched flow charts and visualization sketches?
  • Is my general aesthetic direction being initially presented through sketches, inspiration or mood boards, or links to selected influences?
  • What would give an accurate representation of your project at its most basic understanding at this mid-level stage?
  • Are you addressing user interfaces and screen/environmental real estate (or appropriate components) in terms of general requirements and assigned proportions, scale, etc?
Grading

The outline should take into account all parts of your project.

  • The presentation needs to be a continuation of your PowerPoint document. Any file that needs to be run, such as a separate movie or executable file, should be included and linked so it’s easy to find.
  • The presentation must be visually polished and clearly written. Each slide or frame needs to be well documented and clear.
  • The ideation stage needs to clearly demonstrate that you have selected and initiated a general (to committed) direction of development.
Project A, Part 3 - Power Point Presentation


Part 4: Medium-Fidelity prototypes, Gameplay, User-Testing and Feedback

Objective

At some point throughout your development, you need to get feedback from actual users if you are creating and interactive experience or game. In part 4, implement user testing if appropriate to your project. If you are developing an enviroment, character or model, get feedback from other professors who have expertise in your particular area. Document this feedback and be prepared to present and discuss how it has or will affect your development direction.

Interactive and gaming projects should be getting clost to an MVP, even if aesthetic development is still in the works.

Presentation.

For this assignment, you’ll need to continue adding slides and sections to your PowerPoint presentation.  (If you find you need more slides or want to change the order, that’s fine.) If your prototype can fit into the slides themselves, put it there. Otherwise, provide a link or directions for running or viewing your prototype, and make sure it’s easy to find.



Part 5: Concept Development and Prototype or Advanced Render

Objective

Submit a part of your project that demonstrates sketches,  a proof of concept or mid-level working prototype. Your submission needs to show in some way that you are capable of performing the work required on the project as well as finishing it with the remaining two weeks. The proof of concept presentation needs to clearly show everything you wish to say. This doesn’t have to be a lengthy presentation (you may find as few as five slides are enough), but it does need to be complete and functional.

Process Outline

Begin by looking at what kind of project you are making, and how best to show off its charms and features quickly and efficiently. Take a look at your proposal again, and pick out the main features—what really sets your project apart from others? This answer is probably what you’ll want to prototype. If you’re doing something complex like a game, you may find you only have the time and resources to flesh out a few mechanics and get them on paper, and that a few side rules are left out. As long as the MAJOR points of your project are represented, you’ll be able to adequately show anyone your idea.

Once you have your prototype in working or viewable order, you’ll need to pick a way to best showcase it. The old adage “70% how you look, 20% how you sound, and 10% what you say” is unfortunately still true in some industry circles, and you wouldn’t want to lose your one chance by not taking the time to polish your

Presentation.

For this assignment, you’ll need to continue adding slides and sections to your PowerPoint presentation.  (If you find you need more slides or want to change the order, that’s fine.) If your prototype can fit into the slides themselves, put it there. Otherwise, provide a link or directions for running or viewing your prototype, and make sure it’s easy to find.

Your prototype should have a descriptive slide for directions or main features, even if it’s located outside the presentation. Run your presentation past a friend to check for clarity, or post working versions of it to the Discussion Board for feedback. Make sure to describe in your presentation WHY this prototype fulfills the requirements. Remember you can also show past work if you think it will help clarify a point or show feasibility. While your prototype does need to be new and unique for your project, old work can sometimes help with explanations.

This is your first formal presentation of your final project, so make it shine!

Process Questions

Listed below is a series of queries designed to aid you in addressing the topics in the Process Outline section. While not all of these questions may be relevant to your particular project, they indicate the general nature, direction, and level of detail you should be trying to achieve. Do not feel as if you must address every one of these questions if they do not pertain. They are merely ideas to get you started thinking along the right track.

  • What’s one of the most defining aspects of your project? Is there something in particular it all hinges upon?
  • If your defining aspect is too large, is there some major piece of it that you can show?
  • What would give an accurate representation of your project at its most basic Stage?
  • Is your project interactive? Is there a means by which you can get part of it up and running so someone can test it?
  • Is there anything similar you’ve done in the past that you can reference? How did you tackle this project? How does it relate to your current one?
  • If you were a publisher looking to spend money on your project, what would you like to see to give the thumbs-up?
  • How would you want to review a project presentation? Would you want to have complete control over the transitions in the slides, or would you prefer to sit back and have it play itself?
Grading

The outline should take into account all parts of your project.

  • The presentation needs to be a PowerPoint presentation, or some other form of easily navigated “slides.” Any file that needs to be run, such as a separate movie or executable file, should be included and linked so it’s easy to find.
  • The presentation must be visually polished and clearly written. Each slide or frame needs to be well documented and clear, as you won’t be able to answer questions on the fly.
  • The proof of concept needs to clearly demonstrate that you are capable of the work, the project, idea is sound, and that it can be finished in a timely Manner.
  • Your presentation should have a cover slide or page that shows your name, the project name, date, professor’s name, and course number.
Project A, Part 3 - Power Point Presentation due on Thursday, Nov 1, 2018.


Final Studio I Project:
Part 6: Final Presentation

This is the final Milestone: the project is complete and polished.

https://www.teamgantt.com https://kanbantool.com/ https://yukaichou.com/gamification-examples/octalysis-complete-gamification-framework/